Marketing, Organization and Management Division

The department covers a wide range of disciplines and consists of around 60 employees. The thematic areas covered by the department include marketing, international trade, international economy, organization and management, information systems / ICT, emergency preparedness and crisis management, experience economics and tourism, ecological economics, ethics, philosophy and corporate social responsibility.

Teaching

The members of the department provide teaching and supervising within all of the study programmes developed in the Business School on bachelor, master and PhD levels. They teach and supervise students in the fields of strategy, management, international business and marketing, consumer behaviour, experience based economy and innovation, preparedness and crisis management, digitalization and business process management.​


Research Groups​​

International Business, Marketing and Strategy

The research group has a strong team with teaching and research on international business and marketing strategy. Within this overarching theoretical fields, the department focus on issues related to export marketing strategies and positioning, marketing channel design and choice, international trade and market access and international branding. Some key areas in branding are customer values and Nordic values and qualities. Many of the research projects and publications are related to contextual peculiarities with high relevance for the North, such as international food trade, market access and industrial markets at the one hand and conspicuous consumption, tourism and service dominant logic at the other hand. 

​Koordinator: Frode Nilssen
​Professor
​Tor Korneliussen
​Professor
Frank Lindberg
​Professor
​Christel Elvestad
​Professor
​Frode Soelberg
​Assosiate Professor
Abbas Strømmen-Bakhtiar
Assosiate Professor
Nina Kramer Fromreide
​Lecturer
​June Borge Doornich
Assosiate Professor
​Rune Opdahl
Lecturer
Morten Stene
Assosiate Professor
Anastasiya Henk
​Researcher
Per Ivar SeljesethLecturer
Valeria Nyu
​Research Fellow
​Pamela Ogada
​Research Fellow
Azif Ijaz
​Research Fellow
Alena Nelaeva
​Research Fellow

​External

Salih Tamer Cavusgil​
Professor II
Michael Greenacre
Professor II
Geir Hønneland Professor II

Marketing Management, and Innovation of Experiencies (MMIE)

MMIE was established in spring 2008, and was central in developing the application for, management of and doing research within the large eight year research project 'Norther Insight' (www.opplevelserinord.no ) in cooperation with other research organizations and the industry. MMIE is hosted within Nord University Business school, section 'Marketing, Organisation and Management' (MOM), even though it involves also researchers from other sections, faculties and organizations. The main contextual areas are experiences, in particular nature based, culture based and food/meals, as part of tourism and leisure. Topics and subfields have gradually changed since being established, as indicated in the figure below, and most aspects are interdisciplinary. 



Members of the research group organize research seminars with discussion of papers or ideas, manage and develop research applications, manage and work in formal and informal research projects, disseminate research in education, research conferences, participate in industry relations, networks and activities, contributing to the development of industries and society. Publications can be found by following the links to the personal profiles of the group members further.

Koordinator: Dorthe Eide
​Professor
Hin Hoarau-Heemstra
​Associate Professor
Frank Lindberg
Professor
Tor Korneliussen
Professor
​Olga Høegh-Guldberg
​Postdoc Researcher
​Sabrina Seeler
Postdoc Researcher
​Rune Opdahl
​Lecturer
​Veronika Trengereid
​Research Fellow
Yati Yati
Research Fellow
Evelyne Fetingyte
Research Fellow
Karin Andrea Wigger
Associate Professor
​Bjørn Willy Åmo
​Professor
​Nadezda Nazarova          
Associate Professor
Elisabet Carine Ljunggren
Professor
Anne Wally Falch Ryan
Associate Professor
Tonje Kvam        
Research Fellow
Evgueni Vinogradov
​Researcher II
Karin Marie Antonsen   
Researcher II
Lena Mossberg
​Professor II
​Sølvi Solvoll
Associate Professor



Emergency Preparedness and Crisis Management

The research group Emergency Preparedness and Crisis Management has a focus on security related to various types of business activities, and on how companies and public administrations build up preparedness for crises. Particularly, the research group works with emergency response in high-response organizations, and collaboration between various actors related to more extensive adverse events such as natural disasters, pandemics, pollution, mass damage, cyber-attacks and hybrid threats. Inter-organizational cooperation and management at various levels of decision-making are central themes, including cooperation between private and public, civil and military actors as well as the roles of voluntary organizations and local community in emergency preparedness. The research group is leading an international professional network "Arctic Safety and Security" within the University of the Arctic umbrella.

The research group has a focus on competence development within emergency preparedness with a special emphasis on simulator-based training and practice, and full-scale exercises. The research group has the main responsibility for the work at NORDLAB, Nord University's emergency management laboratory and is co-responsible for Exercise Nord.


Koordinator: Odd Jarl Borch​Professor
Per Arne Godejord
​Senior lecturer
Natalia Andreassen​Associate Professor
Beata Joanna Godejord
​Associate Professor
​Per Erik Solli       
​Adviser
Ensieh Kheiri Pileh Roud
Research Fellow
Johannes Schmied
Research Fellow
Bjørn Gunnarsson
​Associate Professor
Roberto Rivas Hermann
​Associate Professor
Kjell Stokvik
​Administrative Leader
Øyvind Hanssen
​Associate Professor
​Ning Lin
​Researcher
Andreas Østhagen
Researcher

​External
​Peer Jacob Svenkerud
​Professor II
​Norvald Kjerstad
Professor II


Sustainable Societies and Technology Development

The research group focuses on interdisciplinary projects that contribute to the development of societies with a high quality of life within resilient nature and sustainable economy. Through research, courses and study programs and collaboration with different parts of society, we focus on developing a balance between use and protection of nature and culture in a long-term perspective. The research group Sustainable societies and technology development is rooted in a proactive definition of sustainable development; Sustainable development includes taking care of the individual, society and the environment in a way that is not harmful or destructive but on the contrary is more stimulating and life-enhancing. Ecological economics and adapted use of technology is important in sustainable quality-of-life societies

Koordinator: Ove Daniel Jakobsen
​Professor
Bjørn Gunnarsson
​Associate Professor
Jan-Oddvar Sørnes
​Professor
Terje Fallmyr
​Associate Professor
Alf Håvard Dahl
​Lecturer
Amsale Kassahun Temesgen
​Research Fellow
Vivi Marie Lademoe Storsletten
Associate Professor
Are Severin Ingulfsvann
Associate Professor
Beata Joanna Godejord
Associate Professor
Øyvind Hanssen
Associate Professor
Rune Bostad
​Lecturer
Øystein Nystad
​Docent
Gro Talleraas
​Lecturer
​Kjell Ellingsen
​Lecturer
Anneke Sijtske Leenheer
​Lecturer


Management and Contemporary Leadership


​Koordinator: Bjørn Olsen
​Professor
Wenche Aarseth
​Professor
​Roger Klev
​Professor
Alf Håvard Dahl
​Lecturer
Jan Ole Similä
Associate Professor
Hanne Stokvik
​Lecturer

​External
​Tom Karp
​Professor II
​Rudi Kirkhaug    
Professor II
​Jan Thorsvik       
Professor II



Selected research projects​

The Sharing Economy

Project aim
Describe, discuss and develop sharing economy in theory and practice

Project team (HHN)
Ove Jakobsen and Are Ingulfsvann

Project partners
Cicero, Oslo

Source of financing
Cicero

Timeline
January 2018 – December 2020

Ecopreneurship - Applied Ecopreneurship Methodologies

Project aim
Develop courses and study programs in ecopreneurship

Project team (HHN)
Ove Jakobsen and Vivi ML Storsletten

Project partners
SJH, Schumacher College in England, CEMUS at Uppsala University

Source of financing
ERASMUS +

Timeline
December 2017 – December 2019

Book project "kreativ næring"


Project aim
Forskning om livskraftige samfunn og kulturnæring

Project team (HHN)
Ove Jakobsen and Vivi ML Storsletten

Project partners
BI og Kulturnæringsstiftelsen SpareBank 1 Nord-Norge

Source of financing
Kulturnæringsstiftelsen SpareBank 1 Nord-Norge

Sustainable Arctic Cruise Communities: from Practice to Governance


Project aim
For small and remote Arctic communities, the arrival of cruise ships can provide economic opportunities, such as offering tours to local attractions and supply services for the cruise ships. Nevertheless, the arrivals of cruise ships have been heavily discussed because of negative social and environmental impacts that are experienced by local communities. Examples are pollution, waste problems, loss of culture, overuse of local infrastructure, invasion of non-native species and trampling.

This project addresses the challenges these communities face by creating knowledge of sustainable cruise practices in Arctic communities. In particular, knowledge is needed about how the cruise industry and Arctic communities can learn to co-exist and how controversies and disadvantages can be turned into opportunities for sustainable development. The project develops a toolkit for sustainable cruise tourism development which can promote a transition towards sustainable cruise visits in Arctic communities and thereby support the development of meaningful livelihoods for residents in the Arctic.

The project consists of four work packages: 1) Multidisciplinary conceptual framework, 2) Case studies, 3) Governance towards sustainable cruise practices and 4) Project management and coordination.

Project team (employees involved from the faculty):
Hindertje H. Heemstra, Karin Wigger

Project partners
Aalborg University (Denmark), Dalarna University (Sweden), Nordland Research Institute, Icelandic Tourism Research Centre (Iceland), Uppsala University Gotland (Sweden), NARFU (Russia)
Source of financing
Research Council of Norway, Program: Nordområdene og Russland

Timeline
This project starts in September 2020 and has a duration of three years
 
 

Sustainable Future for Experience-based Travelling


Project Aim

The aim of this project was to develop knowledge about the interaction between certification processes, learning and innovation in Norwegian tourism destinations.

Objectives and research questions
The brand or certification Sustainable Tourism Destination has provided participating destinations in Norway with a tool for systematic work with and for sustainable development (Vista Analysis, 2016). The certification scheme has offered destination companies (DMOs), tourism operators and municipalities a framework for constructive cooperation and operationalization of the sustainability concept. In this project we studied collaboration and learning for sustainability in participating destinations and how collaboration can contribute to innovation and increased sustainability. In the evaluation of Sustainable Destinations (Vista Analysis, 2016), it was concluded that the work on sustainability is firmly rooted in the municipality but less well in tourism companies and communities. The report also writes that there are companies that have a more vague relationship to sustainable development and branding than the municipality. Hence, there is a decoupling between ambitions of the municipality and the local involvement. Based on this, we have developed four research questions (RQ) that have been addressed this project.

RQ 1: What are the important motives behind companies' and destinations' decisions to get certified with an emphasis on sustainability, and in particular what significance do business / managers' value preferences have?

In the evaluation of the branding scheme, most travel destinations have stated the desire to become more sustainable as the main reason for participating in the scheme (Vista Analysis, 2016). It is therefore important to find out how local actors understand sustainability, what they put into the concept and what they prioritize in relation to the development of their own organization and the destination.

RQ 2: What are the main differences between the different certification situations in regard of learning and innovation? We have examined two destinations that are both certified as sustainable destinations and world heritage site and two that are certified as sustainable destinations only. We have been particularly interested in how the experience of world heritage status has influenced the certification process to become a sustainable destination.

RQ 3: How does being part of a destination that works systematically with sustainable development impact innovation, collaboration and value-creation of experience-based tourism companies? 

RQ 4: How can we practically operationalize sustainable development, and the value creation dimension in sustainable development, through important critical issues tourism players should work on? With this question we try to find out how engagement with the experience-based tourism players can be promoted.

We have focused our research on four Norwegian tourism destinations that are labelled sustainable: Trysil, Røros, Vega and Den Gyldne Omvei (Inderøy). Data was collected the summer of 2017 and autumn of 2019. The gap in the data collection was caused by the maternity leave of the project leader. We divided the empirical research among three researchers: professor Dr. Dorthe Eide (Nord University), Associate professor Dr. Hin Hoarau-Heemstra (Nord University) and Unni Myklevold, Msc (Lofoten reiselivfagskole). The researchers were spending several days at the destinations to observe, interview and talk to destination stakeholders and followed up with Skype interviews if the informants were unavailable during the fieldwork-week. In addition to face-to-face interviews on location, we conducted interviews via Skype with the national certification organization Innovation Norway, as well as Hanen. The latter offers an eco-certifications at the business level. All 34 interviews were transcribed verbatim (by Troll i Ord). Initially all interviews were read, and sections dealing with learning, knowledge sharing, sustainability and innovation were noted. In a second round of analysis, we compared the cases with each other and looked for commonalities and differences. We have complemented our empirical data gathering with the study of reports and documents like handlingsplaner (Røros, Trysil and Vega), Evaluaring av bærekraftig reisemål (Vista Analyse, 2016), nettsider til destinasjonsselskaper, nettside Innovasjon Norge, nettside deltagende bedrifter). As per today, we have not finished our data analysis yet due to the additional data that was added in the autumn of 2019. Our findings that we present in this report should therefore be regarded as preliminary.

Our analysis is built around the main themes of our research: the understanding of sustainability (what, vision); learning opportunities in the certification process (who, how and coordination); learning and knowledge integration linked to the certification process; innovation (what, where and who) and potential for improvement.

Based on our analysis we see that destinations are challenged in developing a shared vision regarding sustainability and our study points to different ways tourism organizations understand sustainability. We present how different actors understand the outcomes of the certification process. We further discuss how and if knowledge from the certification process is used for innovation.

Project team (HHN)
Hin Hoarau-Heemstra (project leader)
Dorthe Eide
Øystein Nystad

Project Partner
Unni Myklevoll (Lofoten Reiselivsfagskole)
Source of financing
Stimuleringsmidler forskning og utvikling VRI Nordland

Timeline
December 2016 – February 2020

Findings

Sustainability: motives and values

Informants' main idea about sustainability is that it is the responsibility of all stakeholders involved and that knowledge is crucial to make sustainable decisions. Several stakeholders mentioned the demand from customers as an important driver to work with sustainability. However, for the interviewed business actors sustainability was a rather vague concept that got mainly linked to waste management. When digging further into the concept, we found three main concerns.

1) concern for sustainability aspects tends to be linked to sector, i.e. those working with nature focused on green and environmental aspects, culture-based firms are concerned with heritage and cultural sustainability, culinary experience-based firms focused on social sustainability. Environmental sustainability is important for the business informants. Especially in Vega, where cultural heritage and ecological sustainability are related to fisheries and eider ducks.  However, in the other destinations, few mention the relationship between tourism and wildlife. Biodiversity is one of the topics of the destination certification but not many dare to burn their fingers on the topic, especially regarding living with predators like wolves.

2) keep local communities vital and lively. This ambition is threatened by an aging and migrating population. Therefore, the focus needs to be on whole-year tourism activities that will create a chain reaction where guests in other seasons will make it possible for other businesses, like sport-shops and restaurants, to stay open all year round. This is expected to help the local community to become sustainable and attractive.

3) focus on sustainability can lead to rigid preservation (making the place into a museum'), especially when combined with the world heritage status. Tourism business actors argue that such preservation can hamper work and a living society; instead, preservation should come from usage and innovation.

Municipalities and DMO's are motivated to get certified because of marketing advantages, effectivization of internal processes and increase of quality of the tourism product. Innovation Norway has the ambition that firms in sustainable destinations should get an environmental management certification at the business level. This will provide firms with knowledge and integration across levels. The businesses who have a certification, get promoted on websites of innovation Norway and the municipality. So far, only few tourism businesses have the miljøfyrtårn certification and even fewer of the businesses with a certification work with tourism experiences. The hotel in Vega had started with its certification process (Miljøfyrtårn) but has given up because they experienced the label as requiring too much work, bureaucratic and with a too narrow environmental focus. The same reasons were given by other stakeholders in the studied destinations. Inderøy and Den Gylne Omvei managed to get more of their members certified, or involved in the certification process, by offering support from the municipality. It seems that working with a label on the business level helps to internalize the sustainable destination certification. The destination label gets more meaning when businesses start working with their own certification because they are able to operationalize the different aspects of sustainability. Although few actually manage to get certified, it seems that the tourism experience businesses in our cases do work with and according to sustainability principles but not professionally or systematically. The reasons that are given are lack of time and a misfit with the activities of the business.

Different certification situations

We saw in all four destinations, in the first round of certification, that learning took place when local actors had to translate and concretize what sustainability could mean on the destination level, and how to implement the criteria from innovation Norway that are based in the UN-sustainability criteria. Synergy between existing plans and ambitions is important when implementing a sustainable destination project.

For example, learning from the certification process was enhanced by the experiences with the world heritage status. Getting certified means a lot of documentation and governance locally. Especially Vega got these routines quickly in place because the World Heritage status demanded much of the same documentation processes.

Thinking along the line of making the tourism industry more efficient and clean fitted a destination like Trysil because they used to be a forestry society where they had spent a lot of thoughts about how garbage from the forestry industry could be re-used. When innovation Norway asked the municipality and DMO if they were interested in the project, they initially thought they could combine several environmental improvements under one umbrella.

After the initial pilot period of three years, all the destinations we studied decided to get recertified. What is important for a recertification process is that there are no major changes compared to the first round of certification. It seems the destination can handle incremental changes but see the initial certification as an investment for later rounds. It is expected that the workload will get less with the maintenance of the certification system.

Innovation, collaboration and value-creation

Positive consequences of being certified are an increased awareness of sustainability indicators amongst tourism actors in the destination. And that sustainability is now communicated and acted upon. Besides waste and water management, energy efficiency is an important sustainability driver for innovation. Another innovative development that followed the sustainability destination was the investment in and marketing of other seasons. Many actors are now involved several networks and there is little doubt that there has been an increase in activities at the destination level, creating positive synergies. The destinations work more systematic, professional and thorough, and some of these changes reach the firms. But there is potential for more involvement, and bottom up processes. Especially tourism experience firms have a hard time to directly link the sustainable destination certification process to their own innovation processes. Since the destinations got certified, the number of businesses with an environmental label have increased. However, at the same time the actors involved in destination certification have realized that the environmental certification can be too demanding for micro-sized businesses. That means that only larger companies got certified, like hotels and other service-based businesses.

Sustainable future of Norwegian tourism

In order to operate in a more sustainable manner, certifications at both the destination and business level should complement each other. Hospitality businesses often have a business level certification that assists them on their path to sustainability. It fits their activities, challenges and possibilities. While the micro-sized experience based companies fall out because they are too small; it is too costly for them to start the certification process or the certification does not fit with their activities that are often a combination of different things. We identified different expectations and ways of learning during the certification process and recertification process. Enabling and facilitating knowledge and learning is not an easy task for governmental organizations that find themselves in the middle of different networks, values and knowledge cultures. We saw that knowledge often sticks to governmental organizations and learning takes mostly place between organizations responsible for the certification. One reason can be the different ways in which sustainability is understood in tourism destinations. That makes it difficult to develop a shared vision of the concept to facilitate absorptive capacity of new knowledge. This is a challenge that the destinations are facing because sustainability means something else for different organizations, depending on their sector, their role in the destination and their size. A common vision can be developed through certification at the business level .It is necessary that all voices are gathered around the table and that their complex and often conflicting requirements are considered. The management of the sustainability certification process dominated much of the discussion, and tourism businesses were only brought in to disseminate information to in later stages of the process. In order to transform into a sustainable destination where values mean more than what is written on the wall (value-statements in certification programs) stakeholders need to develop a trusting, learning and sharing culture through the collective intelligence and knowledge of the people and organizations who make up the destination.


Joint-task Force Management in High North Emergency Response


Project aim
This project focuses on emergency management competence and the development of tailor-made programs for education and training of key personnel involved in emergency operations. The project elaborated on the need for knowledge transfer of best practice and the development of management standards for a transparent response to severe accidents.

Project team (HHN)
MARPART2-MAN project is led by the High North Center at Nord University Business School.
-          Project leader - Professor Odd Jarl Borch.
-          Key researcher – Associate Professor Natalia Andreassen
-          Researcher – PhD student Johannes Schmied
-          Researcher – PhD student Ensieh Kheiri Pileh Roud
-          Administrative support – Advisor Andrey Kazakov
 
Project partners
-          High North Centre at Nord University Business School (Norway)
-          Norwegian Police University College (Norway)
-          World Maritime University (Sweden)
-          University Center in Svalbard (Norway)
-          Murmansk State Technical University (Russia)
-          Northern (Arctic) Federal University (Russia)
-          Norwegian Fire Protection Institute (Norway)
-          Royal Norwegian Naval Academy Navigation Center (Norway)
-          Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (Norway)

Source of financing
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Norway Arctic 2030 program.
Nordland County Administration
Nord university

Timeline
2016- 2020

Additional information
The project facilitates knowledge transfer between the educational system, government institutions and emergency key personnel dealing with cross-border high-crisis situations. The project has as it objective to contribute to more tailor-made task force education and to more goal-oriented and cost-efficient training and exercise schemes  For publications see details at www.cristin.no. More information about the project at www.marpart.no

 

Inter-organizational Coordination of Mass Rescue Operations in Complex Environments (MAREC)


Project aim
The MAREC project focuses on inter-organizational coordination of mass rescue operations in complex environments. The project aims at improving the knowledge on the emergency preparedness policy framework and the coordinative roles and mechanisms of the rescue services. The project addresses inter-organizational and inter-jurisdictional coordination of large scale crisis situations including several emergency agencies and several countries.

Project team (HHN)
MARPART2-MAN project is led by the High North Center at Nord University Business School.
-          Project leader - Associate Professor Natalia Andreassen
-          Coordinator - Professor Odd Jarl Borch
-          Researcher – PhD student Johannes Schmied
-          Researcher – PhD student Ensieh Kheiri Pileh Roud
-          Administrative support – Advisor Andrey Kazakov
 
Project partners
-          High North Centre at Nord University Business School (Norway)
-          University Center in Svalbard (UNIS) (Norway)
-          UiT – The Arctic University of Norway (Norway)
-          Norwegian Police University College (PHS) (Norway)
-          Admiral Makarov State Maritime Academy (Russia)
-          Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada)
-          University of Iceland (Iceland)
-          University of Greenland (Greenland)
-          World Maritime University (Sweden)

Source of financing
Research Council of Norway, Nord university and partners

Timeline
2018-2021

Additional information
This project contributes to the management theory, emphasizing generic managerial roles and coordination processes, organizational theory on structuring mechanisms, and institutional theory in targeting environments where a large number of stakeholders are involved. The empirical setting of this study  is mass rescue operations both at sea and land, where a broad range of emergency response actors, including volunteers are involved. For more information about publications, see  www.cristin.no

More information about the project is found at the webpage (www.marpart.no) and NORDLAB​
 
 

The Arctic Operational Emergency Agency Innovation Platform (ACOPE)

 
Project aim
The project aim is to design an Arctic operational emergency agency knowledge and competence exchange innovation platform and develop the network of Arctic emergency agencies in Europe. The project provide cooperative links between the innovation consortium to the UArctic academic thematic network on Arctic Safety and Security, the Arctic Council EPPR working group and the Arctic Coast Guard Forum (ACGF)

Project team (HHN)
ACOPE project is led by the Joint Rescue Coordination Center North Norway. HHN is represented in the project by professor Odd Jarl Borch, Advisor Line Sandbakken and Advisor Andrey Kazakov.

Project partners
15 partners from Norway, Faroes, Finland, Denmark/Greenland and Iceland
Source of financing
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Norway under the frame of Arktis 2030 program

Timeline
2018-2019 (extended to 2020)


 

Arctic and North Atlantic Security and Emergency Preparedness Network (ARCSAR)

 
Project aim
The overall aim of the project is to improve emergency response through fast-track uptake of existing innovations and knowledge by practitioners, predict future needs for innovation and knowledge, and identify priorities for security and standardization og emergency response across the Arctic and North Atlantic region. More about ARCSAR project at www.arcsar.eu.

Project team (HHN)
ARCSAR project is led by the Joint Rescue Coordination Center North Norway. HHN presented in the project by the Professor Odd Jarl Borch and Advisor Line Djernæs Sandbakken.

Project partners
21 partners from Norway, Faroes, UK, USA, New Zealand, Germany, Finland, Ireland, Italy, Russia, Canada, Sweden and Iceland
Source of financing
The project is financed by the Horizon 2020 EU program and partners.

Timeline
2019 – 2023


 

Strengthened Ties between Emergency Response Professionals and Academic Institutions

 
Project aim
The main goal of this project is the strengthening of ties between emergency response professionals in the Arctic countries and educational institutions within the UArctic thematic network on Arctic Safety and Security. The project focuses on knowledge, skills and competence development within emergency preparedness and response operations in the Arctic, including local community resilience.

Project team (HHN)
-          Project leader - Professor Odd Jarl Borch
-          Research coordinator – Associate Professor Natalia Andreassen
-          Researcher – PhD student Johannes Schmied
-          Researcher – PhD student Ensieh Kheiri Pileh Roud
-          Administrative support – Advisor Andrey Kazakov
 
Project partners
UArctic “Arctic Safety and Security” thematic network members are partners in this project (https://www.uarctic.org/organization/thematic-networks/arctic-safety-and-security/)

Source of financing
The project is funded by the University of the Arctic (UArctic) and Nord university.

Timeline
2018-

Additional information
The thematic network on Arctic Safety and Security has been established within the University of the Arctic (UArctic). It comprises 25 universities and research institutes involved in education and research within safety and security, emergency prevention, preparedness and response (see link above). The thematic network is initiated and coordinated by Nord university.
 
 

CAMAR -  The Norwegian Center for High North Preparedness and Arctic Maritime Competence


Project aim
The CAMAR project is targeting the competence needs of the Arctic region needed for a safe and sustainable commercial activity. The CAMAR project has as its main objective to create a platform for a leading competence center based at Nord university within the area of safe and sustainable marine and maritime arctic operations, emergency prevention, preparedness and response. CAMAR shall be a central node within the networks of companies and institutions working on marine and maritime competence in the Arctic.  The CAMAR project will establish a consortium of academic institutions, including simulator centers, in the Arctic countries focusing on security management education and training of personnel within companies, government agencies, voluntary organizations and local communities, and create a test arena for managerial concepts and management support tools tailor-made for security and emergency preparedness personnel.

Project team (HHN)
-          Project leader - Professor Odd Jarl Borch
-          Coordinator -  Senior Advisor Hege Stenhammer
-          Coordinator  - Advisor Line Sandbakken
-          Simulator coordination -  Senior Advisor Rune Elvegaard
-          IT-coordination – Senior advisor Bent Hansen 
 
Source of financing
Nordland County Administration and Nord university

Timeline
Project period: 2015-2020

Additional information
The project has established the Nord university Preparedness management laboratory NORDLAB including word- class simulators for air and sea operations, emergency response fleet management systems for tactical-operational coordination, and decision support tools for crisis management.  NORDLAB is integrated into the UArctic  thematic network on Arctic Safety and Security including 25 universities and research institutes (https://www.uarctic.org/organization/thematic-networks/arctic-safety-and-security/). NORDLAB is a part of EMSN -a simulator network including universities and research institutes in Europe and Asia (https://emsn.connect.fraunhofer.de/). NORDLAB has strong links to the emergency response agencies among others through decentralized simulator units and communication systems.  NORDLAB is offering tailor-made courses 
and exercises in crisis- and emergency management for university students, emergency response agencies, companies and organizations.

For more information, see NORDLAB


 

Sustainability and Life Equality in Green Cities


Project aim
Citizen participation is crucial in creating diverse, attractive, innovative and sustainable cities. Creating good arenas for participation is a fundamental premise for a well-functioning democracy. In this project, we will adapt and test a methodology to strengthen the quality of life and citizen participation in urban development. The main goal is to make participation as real as possible, so that this can form the basis for a green city policy in small and medium-sized cities in the north.

Project team (HHN)
Amsale K. Temesgen

Project partners
Nordlandsforskning, Bodø kommune, Senter for teknologi, innovasjon og kultur ved Universitetet i Oslo og Nordland fylkeskommune

Source of financing
Nordland fylkeskommune

Timeline
2019-2020

Project outputs
Workshop in Bodø center focusing on the concept ‘Smart Bodø’.
 

Small Cities Urbanism in the North: New Methods for Involvement and Increased Life Equality (SMURF)

 
Project aim
The overall goal of the qualification project is to study and test new methods of participation and mapping of quality of life, as well as using these experiences to develop a larger project and methodology to understand the premises for participation and quality of life in green development of small and medium-sized cities in the North.

Project team (HHN)
Amsale K. Temesgen

Project partners
Nordlandsforskning, Bodø kommune, Nordland fylkeskommune

Source of financing
Forprosjekt – RFFNORD

Timeline
2019

Project outputs
-          Workshop in Vågan municipality.
-          Temesgen, A., Guillen-Royo, M. & Vangelsten, B.V. (2018) Citizen participation for sustainability and quality of life in Vågan municipality, Norway. Cool Planning: Changing Climate & Our Urban Future, 54th ISOCARP CONGRESS, Bodø, Norway.
-          Forthcoming book chapter: ‘Human needs and sustainable transport practices in vågan, Lofoten Islands, Norway’.


Digital Transformation in My Organization (DiVi)

 
Project aim
The main aim of the project is to provide knowledge about digital transformation processes so that regional companies can develop their businesses – hopefully increase their competitive advantage.

Project team (HHN)
Jan Ole Similä (project leader), Lars Molden, Øyvind Hansen, Morten Stene, Lill-Beathe Håpnes

Project partners
Steinkjer Næringsforum, Verdal Næringsforum, Namdal Næringsforening, Ranaregionen Næringsforening

Source of financing
Kompetanse Norge

Wind Assisted Ship Propulsion (WASP)

Project aim:
The project brings together universities, wind-assist technology providers with ship owners to research, trial and validate the operational performance of a selection of wind propulsion solutions thus enabling wind propulsion technology market penetration and contributing to a greener North Sea transport system through harvesting the regions abundant wind potential. 
 
The WASP project will help to accelerate this decarbonisation transition by giving the market and policy makers clear indicators on operational parameters, fuel savings, business models and a collection of additional demonstrator vessels to highlight the wind-assist propulsion potential.
 
 
Project team (HHN)
 
Roberto Rivas Hermann, Ning Lin
 
Project partners
 
13 partners in the Northern Sea Region https://northsearegion.eu/wasp/project-partners/
Project lead by Netherlands Maritime Technology
 
 
Source of financing
 
Funded by the Interreg North Sea Europe programme, part of the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). Project size: €5.4 million.
 
More information:
https://www.nord.no/en/news-events/news/Pages/EU-backed-Wind-Assist-Ship-Propulsion-Project-Sets-Sail-on-its-Three-Year-Voyage.aspx 
 
https://northsearegion.eu/wasp/about/

Russia's Role in the Contemporary International Food Trade System

Project aim:  The critical question is: what are the prospects for Russia's use of food as an instrument of foreign policy being successful? In short, will the weaponization of food trade work? This project posits three parts to address the issue of food and foreign policy. (Each part will be developed in detail as to method, rational, and scope).

1.  creation of a data base of events since 1980 in which large states used food trade as an instrument of foreign policy.  The purpose is to examine if the tactic worked, why, and under what conditions. Typologies of weaponization will be developed: (1) withholding of market access to a state or states; (2) withholding of commercial sales to a state or states. (3) withholding of food aid; (4) withholding of agricultural development funds. Which works, when, how, and why?​

Project team; Frode Nilssen, HHN and Stephen K. Wegren, Southern Methodist University, Dallas USA

About the project: Russia's food embargo of 2014 represented the weaponization of food trade. Russia is not the first country to use food as an instrument of foreign policy, nor is the food embargo the first time Russia has used food as a political weapon. But the weaponization of food trade is important because the value of Russian food exports is growing and Russian leaders plan to become a global food power. Putin has tasked the agricultural sector to reach $45 billion in food exports by 2024; from there, the plan is for food exports of nearly $80 billion by 2030 and $110 billion by 2035. To put that in context, the world's leading agricultural exporter is the United States at about $72 billion in 2017, with the Germany second at $34 billion. Assuming continued growth in US food exports, Russia is aiming to become at least the number two food exporter in the world, and perhaps number one. In this context, the use of food as an instrument of foreign policy has special importance.

The book will consist of 10 chapters written by some of the leading authors on Russian Food Trade issues. The book is published on Palgrave Publishing and will be available from March 2021. 





 Research division leader