Learning and development of performance in sports

Research group for Learning and Development of Performance in Sports conducts studies about learning/ training and factors that influence performance in sports.

​​​The research group is a part of the research division 
Physical education, sports science and outdoor education

The research group investigates sports performance multidisciplinary from disciplines like physiology, biomechanics, motor learning and control, Science of sports coaching. One of the main targets of our research group is, based on high quality experimental research work, to gain more knowledge about the aspects of sports performance and develop new and optimised training strategies to enhance this performance. In addition, all of our research projects aim to provide practical applications for sport and fitness coaching.

Our main research interests include:

  • 3D analyses of fast discrete movements (soccer kicking and overarm throwing)
  • Warm-up strategies and performance
  • Strength and plyometrics training
  • Endurance training (cross country skiing, athletics and cycling)
  • Sprint and change of direction performance and training
  • Physical performance profiles and competitive performance and/or their changes during the preparatory and competitive seasons in various athlete groups such as weightlifting, track and field athletes (endurance runners and sprinters), cross-country skiing, handball and soccer

Research in our group is often carried out in close cooperation with nationally and internationally recognized universities and research institutes and in collaboration with local clubs and athletes that play and inter / national level. In our research group we involve our bachelor and master students actively in our ongoing research projects, in which they are able to take advantage of our research conditions. Our goal is to educate experts in the field of sports and exercise training by providing scientific understanding of, for example, neuromuscular, psychological, physiological and biomechanical mechanisms.



Research Projects


Active Research Projects


Effect of wearable resistance upon physcial ability in soccer player 
Prof. Roland van den Tillaar in collaboration with prof. John Cronin and research fellow Aaron Uthoff Ph.D. from Sport performance institiute in New Zealand, Auckland (SPRINZ).

Effect of pole length upon cross country skiing performance 
Ass. Prof. Per Øyvind Torsvik in collaboration with Prof. Roland van den Tillaar

Warming-up strategies in cross country skiing 
Prof. Roland van den Tillaar, Guro Strom Solli in collaboration with Sentif.

Effect of sprinting intensity upon kinematics and muscle activation in master sprinters 
Prof. Roland van den Tillaar and Nick Ball from University of Canberra.

Comparison of double poling capacity in successful long distance cross country skiers
Ass. Prof. Per Øyvind Torsvik in collaboration with Prof. Roland van den Tillaar in collaboration with Sentif.

Effect of resisted and aassisted sprint upon kinetics, kinematics and muscle activation in sprinters
Prof. Roland van den Tillaar in collaboration with prof. Ryu Nagahara from National insitute of Fitness and Sport, Kanoya, Japan, Pedro, ass. prof. Jimenez-Reyes from University of Madrid,Spain and Prof. JB Morin from university of Nice, France.

Effect of force-velocity based training
Prof. Roland van den Tillaar in collaboration Ph.D. student Dylan Hicks from university of Adilaide.

Monitoring throwing load measured with IMU in handball
Prof. Roland van den Tillaar in collaboration with Ph.D. Shruti Bhandurge and Research Tom Steward from SPRINZ.

Sticking region in strength training
Prof. Roland van den Tillaar in collaboration with Ass. Prof. Atle Sæterbakken and Ass. Prof. Vidar Andersen from University college of Western Norway, Sogndal.

Comparison of heavy and explosive strength training upon cycling performance in experienced cyclists
M.Sc. student Tine Thomasli in collaboration with prof. Roland van den Tillaar, Ass. prof. Vegar Rangul and Prof. Bent Rønnestad from Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences.


PhD Projects 


Preparing for the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics: knowledge translation from Norwegian XC-skiing


PhD student: Rune Kjøsen Talsnes

The overall objective of this PhD is to examine and describe the development process of Chinese athletes participating in an athlete-transfer program to XC skiers aiming for the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing, by living in Norway and applying best practice of Norwegian XC skiing. Their development of XC skiing specific capacities measured in the laboratory will be given special attention in combination with detaily examination of the characteristics describing the most successful athletes of the program. 

Supervisors: 
Prof. Roland van den Tillaar from Department of Sports Science and Physical Education, Nord University, Levanger, Norway 
Prof. Øyvind Sandbak from Center for Elite Sports Research (SenTIF), Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science (INB), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.

The Throwing Shoulder: The cause of shoulder injuries or pain in experienced handball players?

PhD student: Tina Piil Torabi, PT, CMP, MSc in Physical Therapy

The purpose of this project is to identify throwing techniques with the highest shoulder loading in elite team handball players with examination of  forces (kinetic), joint movement (kinematic) and muscle activity.

Main supervisor:  
Roland Van Den Tillaar, Professor. Department of Sports Sciences and Physical Education at Nord University

CO- supervisor: 
Jesper Bencke, Msc, Ph.D., Laboratory Manager of Human Movement Analysis Laboratory from University Hospital at Hvidovre.

Training characteristics in the world's most successful cross country skier


PhD student: Guro Strøm Solli

The aim of this project is to investigate training over year of the world's most successful cross country skier.

Supervisor: Prof. Øyvind Sandbak from Center for Elite Sports Research (SenTIF), Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science (INB), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.



 Leader of Research Group

 Members

Rune Talsnes​, stipendiat.