DR440E Government Accounting: CIGAR, I/EPSAS, U.S. and China

12 oktober 2015 00:00 - 16 oktober 2015 00:00

University of Nordland, Business School

The purpose of this PhD course introduces students to qualitative and policy-oriented government accounting research in a national or international context.

Application form

Deadline for registration: September 11

7,5 ECTS Credits (5 ECTS + 2,5 ECTS)
Date and place: October 12-16, 2015 at Bodø Graduate School of Business

The purpose and themes of the course
The purpose of this PhD course introduces students to qualitative and policy-oriented government accounting research in a national or international context. The course provides students a systematic and critical exposure to the following areas in government accounting:

  • Comparative international government accounting research (CIGAR) – theoretical and methodological issues
  • International and European Public Sector Accounting Standards (I/EPSAS) - substantive and institutional issues.
  • Illustrations using mainly the United States with China as contrast – institutional structure for standard setting, concepts, principles and standards
  • Possible convergence of international norms for fiscal reporting – budgetary disclosure, financial reporting based on accounts, and reporting of Government Finance Statistics (GFS)

  • Opportunities will be provided for the presentation and discussion of PhD theses or proposals.

    Expected learning outcomes

    Knowledge
    On completion of the course, the candidate will have knowledge and understanding of:
    • main concepts of financial accounting theory and their application towards public sector issues;
    • different types of inquiry and theories in international comparative government accounting research
    • issues on international government accounting harmonization, and its institutions as well as conceptual foundations of different global standards for the public sector accounting;
    • differences and similarities between public sector accounting in different countries with examples from China and USA

    Skills
    On completion of the course, the candidate will be able to:
    • evaluate use of different perspectives and approaches in his/her own research process;
    • reflect on relevant theoretical and methodological assumptions and challenges to study a particular research problem;
    • formulate researchable questions to facilitate data collection process;

    Competence
    On completion of the course, the candidate will be able to:
    • present his/her own and others scholarly work in relevant forums;
    • realize various opportunities for conducting his/her research on the selected topic;
    • defend his/her choice of the theoretical and methodological approach to study the topic;
    • position his/her research in relation to contemporary government accounting literature and explain potential contribution and opportunities for further research.

    Faculty

    James L. Chan, Emeritus Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago, U.S.A; Distinguished Overseas Professor, Peking University, China (primary instructor)
    Frode Mellemvik, Professor, Bodø Graduate School of Business, University of Nordland
    Anatoli Bourmistrov, Professor, Bodø Graduate School of Business, University of Nordland)


    Program

    The course will consist of five sessions:

    Session 1 (October 12): Fundamentals of government financial accounting and reporting
    Session 2 (October 13): Comparative International Government Accounting Research (CIGAR)
    Session 3 (October 14): International/European Public Sector Accounting Standards (I/EPSAS)
    Session 4 (October 15): American government accounting
    Session 5 (October 16): Comparing Chinese and American government accounting

    Each student will receive a complimentary copy of (or be given access to) Government Finance, Accounting and Management: James L. Chan's Selected Papers (Beijing: Peking University Press, in press). Readings from the book are denoted by numbers in parentheses.

    Preparation and format of class sessions

    Students are expected to have read the required course materials. Each seminar session will last three hours. In the first two hours, Prof. Chan will introduce the topic and present a lecture based primarily on the readings. After a break, there will be a session with questions-and-answers and a discussion to relate the topics to the national contexts of interest to the students, or to the students' academic interests. Students are encouraged to take advantage of on-line resources at www.JamesLChan.com  and elsewhere.

session 1: Monday, october 12, 2015

Fundamental of Government Financial Accounting and Reporting
        
Topics:
Government accounting, financial accounting, financial reporting

Entity concepts: public sector, general government sector, government, department, fund

Accounting equation: static version, dynamic version; double-entry recording system

Accounting process: identification, recognition, measurement, reporting

Transactions, events: financial consequences, realized and unrealized consequences

Accrual accounting, accrual basis of accounting; cash accounting, cash basis, cash flows

Historical costs, market value, valuation methods

General purpose financial reporting, financial statements



Required readings:
Chan, J.L. and Qi Zhang, “Government Accounting Standards and Policies,” in International Handbook of Public Financial Management, co-edited by Richard Allen, Richard Hemming and Barry Potter (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), pp. 742-766 (Paper 43) – skip the appendix.

Chan, J.L. and Yunxiao Xu, “Government Financial Reporting Standards and Practices,” in International Handbook of Public Financial Management, co-edited by Richard Allen, Richard Hemming and Barry Potter (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), pp. 767-796 (Paper 44) – up to but not including “budget-related reporting” and remaining sections.

 

session 2: tuesday, october 13, 2015 

Comparative International Government Accounting Research (CIGAR)
 
Topics:
Goals of CIGAR vs. goals of global standards: variability vs. uniformity

Distinctions between basic and applied research, between normative and positive theory

Describing, comparing, and ranking national systems, standards and practices

The Lüder contingency theory of government accounting innovations

Substantive issues: content and context

Methodological uses: case studies and theory development



Required readings:
Chan, James L., “Reflections on CIGAR, IPSAS and Government Accounting in China and the U.S.,” Accounting, Management Control, and Institutional Development, edited by Anatoli Bourmistrov and Olov Olson (Oslo, Norway: Cappelen Akademisk Forlag, 2014), pp. 29-32 (Paper 45) – only the sections on basic and applied research, CIGAR as basic research, research for IPSAS as applied research.

Chan, James L., Rowan H. Jones and Klaus G. Lüder, "Modeling Governmental Accounting Innovations: An Assessment and Future Research Directions," Research in Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting, Vol. 9 (1996), pp. 147-174, including the appendix (Paper 28).

Chan, James L., "Professor Lüder's CIGAR Contributions and Critique: Building a Discipline," in Neues offentlichen Rechnungswesens ed. by D. Budaus, W. Kupper and L. Streitferdt (Germany: Gabler, 2000), pp. 3-18 (Paper 31).

Chan, James L., “CIGAR Methodological Issues and Strategies," Innovations in Government Accounting, edited by Vicente Montesinos and Jose Manual Vela (Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002), pp. 23-29 (Paper 33).



Recommended Internet exercises

Surf the CIGAR Network's website (http://www.cigar-network.net/) to become familiar with its activities and publications, and consider participation.
        

session 3: wednesday, october 14, 2015

International/European Public Sector Accounting Standards

 
Topics:
Rationale for standardization of accounting practices (and theory?)

Span of standardization: international, regional, national, sector

Implications of EPSAS for IPSAS: adaptation vs. adoption

Major conceptual issues of
IPSAS: primacy of general purpose financial reporting
Major conceptual issues of EPSAS: budgetary reporting, financial reporting and statistical reporting

Institutional issues of IPSAS and EPSAS: standard-setting bodies, oversight structure, stakeholders


Required readings:

Chan, James L., “International Public Sector Accounting Standards,” Encyclopedia for Public Administration and Public Policy, 3rd ed. (Taylor & Francis, forthcoming 2015).

“International Public Sector Accounting Standards: Conceptual and Institutional Issues,” in The Harmonization of Government Accounting and the Role of IPSAS, edited by Mariano D’Amore (Milan, Italy: McGraw-Hill, 2009), pp. 19-33.

IPSAS Board Governance Review Group (January 2014), “The Future Governance of the IPSAS Board: Public Consultation” (http://www.oecd.org/gov/budgeting/IPSASB-Consultation-Paper.pdf)

European Commission (November 2013), “Toward implementing European Public Sector Accounting Standards (EPSAS) for EU Member States – Public consultation on future EPSAS governance principles and structures” (http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/10186/752716/EPSASG_consultation_paper.pdf)

Chan, James L., Jens Heiling and Sabine Schuhrer, Toward a Grand Convergence? – International Proposals for Aligning Government Budgets, Accounts and Finance Statistics," Public Money & Management (July, 2013), pp. 297-302 (Paper 42).

Chan, J.L. and Yunxiao Xu, “Government Financial Reporting Standards and Practices,” in International Handbook of Public Financial Management, co-edited by Richard Allen, Richard Hemming and Barry Potter (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), pp. 767-796 (Paper 44) – “budget-related reporting” and remaining sections.

Recommended Internet exercises:
Search on-line for (1) the final report of the IPSAS Board Governance Review Group, and (2) the results of the EU Commission’s public consultation on EPSAS, and current status.

session 4: october 15, 2015

American Government Accounting

 
Topics:

Forces driving the reform of American government accounting in the past 100 years

Institutional changes for regulating American government accounting

Major features of American government accounting and reporting standards

Notable features of the U.S. Government’s annual financial reports

Notable features of American local government financial reports



Required readings:

Chan, James L.,“Reforming American Government Accounting in the 20th Century,” in Handbook of Public Management Practice and Reform, edited by K.T. Liou (NY: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 2000), pp. 97-121 (Paper 16)

Chan, James L., “The Structure of Government Accounting Standards,” Rivista Italiana di Regioneria e di Economia Aziendale (November-December, 2008), pp. 732-742 (Paper 20) – focus on the 2nd part of the paper on generalized American government accounting standards and principles.

Chan, James L. Chan and Yunxiao, Xu, “How Much Red Ink? Comparing the Economic and Accounting Approaches to Measuring [American] Government Deficit and Debt,” World Economics, Vol. 13, No. 1 (January-March, 2012), pp. 65-74 (Paper 24).



Recommended Internet exercises:

Surf the websites of the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) and the (State and Local) Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB): http://www.fasab.gov/; http://www.gasb.org/

Peruse the U.S. Government’s financial report for the 2014 fiscal year http://www.fiscal.treasury.gov/fsreports/rpt/finrep/fr/fr_index.htm

Peruse the comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR) of the City of Chicago for the 2013 fiscal year http://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/fin/supp_info/CAFR/2013/CAFR_2013.pdf
 

session 5: october 16, 2015

Comparing Chinese and American Government Accounting

 
Topics:
Government accounting as value-neutral technology or an instrument of political communication

Official and unofficial media of communication

Similarities and differences between Chinese and American standards and practices

Chinese attitude toward IPSAS and international norms

New developments in Chinese government accounting

Beyond financial accounting: management and cost accounting


Required readings:
Chan, James L. Chan,“New Development: China Adopts Accrual Accounting and Prepares Whole-of-Government Financial Reports” (Draft paper May 2015).

Chan, James L. “Government Accounting with Chinese Characteristics and Challenges: Usefulness and Limitations of Global Standards” (draft paper May 2015).

Chan, James L., “Reflections on CIGAR, IPSAS and Government Accounting in China and the U.S.,” Accounting, Management Control, and Institutional Development, edited by Anatoli Bourmistrov and Olov Olson (Oslo, Norway: Cappelen Akademisk Forlag, 2014), pp. 29-32 (Paper 45) – 2nd part of the paper on China and the U.S.

Zhang, Qi and James L. Chan, “Fiscal Transparency in China: Government Policy and the Role of Social Media,” Public Money and Management (January, 2013), pp. 71-75 (Paper 41).
 





    

practical information

The course will be held on the premises of Bodo Graduate School of Business.
There is a registration fee of NOK 2000 (around EURO 250), which includes course materials and dinners.

Deadline for registration: September 11

Maximum number of participants will be 15. Decision concerning admission is made according to the time of registration among the qualified applicants. Researchers in the field may also participate in the course.

Exit requirement:
 
To finish the course the PhD student is required to complete two course parts:

1) Participate in the course activities in a gathering of 5 days. Attendance at the gatherings is required, shorter absences may be approved upon application. The workload of the course is such that the course section is of 5 ECTS and this requires the completion of the individual mandatory assignment. In this mandatory course assignment students are required to elaborate on 3-4 ideas what he/she has learned that would be useful to his/her PhD work. The paper, six double-spaced pages in length with size 12 font, is to be submitted within two weeks of the conclusion of the course.

2) In order to get additional 2,5 ECTS, students are required to write the second paper to critique a substantive government accounting paper (in an English-language journal) of the student’s choice and approved by the instructor. Students will be also required to conduct reviews of each other’s work (one round) and respond to the critique in order to submit the final version of the paper. The second paper is due within four weeks of the conclusion of the course.

There will be a pass/rewrite assessment for all papers. The course credit is 7,5 ECTS upon completion of both parts.

If you have any questions, please contact: Grete.Ingemann.Knudsen@uin.no  or Anatoli.Bourmistrov@uin.no.


 


james l. chan


James L. Chan, Professor Emeritus of Accounting at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), is Distinguished Overseas Professor at the School of Economics, Peking University, and at Shandong University of Finance and Economics, as well as Professor by Special Appointment at the Research Institute of Fiscal Science of the Ministry of Finance, China. A long-time faculty member at UIC, he was head of the Department of Accounting and the Ernst & Young Professor, as well as the founding director of the Center for Government Accounting Research and Education. During his academic career, he was the Emmett Dedmon Visiting Professor and Senior Lecturer in Public Policy at the University of Chicago; Consulting Professor at Shanghai University of Finance and Economics and Xiamen University; Visiting Professor at University of Cagliari and Bocconi University in Italy, and at Tsinghua University, Sun Yat-sen University, Central University of Finance and Economics, and Zhongnan University of Law and Economics. He had also taught at Syracuse University and Arizona State University in the 1970s.

Chan is author or co-author of seventy-five journal articles and book chapters on government accounting, finance and management, and several monographs. He was founding editor of Research in Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting and has served on several editorial boards, currently Public Money & Management and the China Journal of Accounting Studies. He was elected chairman of the Government and Nonprofit Section in the American Accounting Association, which gave him a Notable Contribution to Literature Award and an Enduring Lifetime Contribution Award. He also received the first Lifetime Research Achievement Award given by the China-America Association of Public Affairs. He served as president of the Chinese Accounting Professors Association in North America, and is a co-founder of the Comparative International Government Accounting Research Network.

Professor Chan has applied his expertise as an advisor to government organizations. He has been a consultant for the Fiscal Affairs Department of the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, U.N. Development Program, and Inter-American Development Bank. He is currently a Special Advisor to the China Association of Chief Financial Officers and advisor to the National Association of Government Budgeting Research in China. He has advised the Chinese Ministry of Finance in official and unofficial capacities since the early 1990s. In the United States, he served on the Research and Education Advisory Panel of the U.S. Comptroller General and was an Academic Fellow at the U.S. General Accounting Office. He served on task forces of the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board and the Governmental Accounting Standards Board. He was on the research staff of the National Council on Governmental Accounting and, as a consultant for the Government Finance Officers Association, worked with several American local governments.

Chan received his B.S., Master of Accounting Science, and Ph.D. in Accountancy degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Chinese by birth and a U.S. citizen, he is based in Oak Park, Illinois and travels frequently to China and elsewhere in the world for lectures and other professional activities.

Email address: jimchan@uic.edu
Mailing address: 941 North Grove Avenue, Oak Park, IL 60302-1341, USA

Telephone: Country code 1, 708 383 1495
Office address for the record:
Department of Accounting (M/C 006)
College of Business Administration
University of Illinois at Chicago
601 South Morgan Street
Chicago, IL 60607-7123
U.S.A.