MARPART news - spring 2017

– Marpart and UArctic spin-off project granted funding of 10,5 million Norwegian Kroner and MARPART publishes MARPART Project Report 2 on Maritime activity and risk patterns in the High North

"MAREC - Inter-organizational coordination of mass rescue operations in complex environments”


– Marpart and UArctic spin-off project granted funding of 10,5 million Norwegian Kroner

"MAREC - Inter-organizational coordination of mass rescue operations in complex environments”
– Marpart and UArctic spin-off project granted funding of 10,5 million Norwegian Kroner
The Marpart Consortium proudly announces that a new international R&D project initiated and led by Nord University Business School has been accepted by the Research Council of Norway (Forskningsrådet). This science-focused project has the title ”MAREC -Inter-organizational coordination of mass rescue operations in complex environments”.

A special focus in this project is put on cooperation between the multitude of public, private and voluntary organizations when it comes to large incidents. Particularly, collaboration beyond country borders will be a central topic of the research. Focus by the participating researchers will be put on increasing the understanding of leadership as well as competence requirements in large incidents requiring cooperation across organizations.

The objectives of the project will also include:
Production of study material for relevant courses
Development as well as testing of training and exercise programs
Fostering the use of latest emergency management simulators

Figure 1 - New Emergency Preparedness Simulator at Nord University

The total budget for the project is 10,5 million Norwegian Kroner of which 8 million Norwegian Kroner will be funded by the Research Council. It will be an additional milestone for the development of emergency management capabilities in large crises.

The project will unite 14 researchers from six different countries representing several universities taking part in the UArctic thematic network on Arctic Safety and Security (see also: uarcticsafetyandsecurity.no). In addition to lead partner Nord University, the participating research institutions include the University Center in Svalbard (UNIS), UiT The Arctic University of Norway, the Norwegian Police University College (Politihøgskolen), Admiral Makarov State Maritime Academy in Russia, Memorial University of Newfoundland/Canada, University of Iceland, University of Greenland (Ilisimatusarfik) and the World Maritime University in Sweden.

Our team around project leader Professor, dr. ekon. Odd Jarl Borch is pleased to receive this trust and potential to take further steps towards strengthened Arctic cooperation and education in the area of emergency management. The project will help us to keep on uniting a majority of the leading universities, practitioners, industry and rescue services in the Arctic countries. It will also strengthen the platform for cooperation within the thematic network on Arctic Safety and Security of the University of the Arctic.



MARPART publishes MARPART Project Report 2 on Maritime activity and risk patterns in the High North

A new report from the Marpart (1) project team is now ready. The Marpart Project Report 2 provides a discussion on dominating risk factors, risk types and the probability of unwanted incidents in the Arctic region. It also provides a coarse-grained evaluation of the potential consequences of different incidents in the northern sea areas of Russia, Norway, Greenland and Iceland. The risk assessments build upon statistics on vessel activity, case studies of real incidents, and expert evaluations of defined situations of potential hazard and accident (DSHA). The evaluations in this study may serve as a platform for more detailed assessments, and as input for discussions on priority areas in respect to safety measures and emergency preparedness.


Figure 2 - The cold climate designed shuttle tanker "Hilda Knutsen" serving the Goliat field (Source:  ENI web page)

For all countries, the main risk factors include severe and unpredictable climatic conditions, expansion of operational range for many categories of vessels into areas with limited or no infrastructure, large distance to emergency preparedness resources, technical limitations as to both vessels and equipment in cold climate areas, and human factors like lack of experience, navigational competence and crew fatigue.

Better vessels, safety equipment adapted to cold climate, improved technology, improved contingency planning, routines and rescue procedures, and safety and training on rescue skills may contribute to increased safety. An effective cooperation between the shipping companies and the government institutions, and between emergency preparedness centers continuously assessing risks and consequences are in demand.


For more detailed information, please have a look at the full report available here